Which Chocolate Brand has the best Environmental Performance?

amee has taken a look at 10 of the UK’s most-loved chocolate brands to see how their environmental and financial performances compare.

Chocolater 2

When it comes to environmental performance, the brand at the top of the pod is the UK’s very own luxury innovation Montezuma’s, with an impressive score of 87 out of 100.

It’s encouraging to see a small British firm like Montezuma’s doing so well both environmentally and financially during these challenging economic times.

The family-run business has demonstrated a strong commitment to ethics and sustainability since its foundation at the turn of the Millenium, including the minimisation of aluminium in wrappers, the re-use of hot water in chocolate melting tanks, and a constant effort to minimise food miles through locally-sourced and recycled packaging.

     Chocolate Brand      

     Current Environmental Score     

     Current Financial Score     

Montezuma’s

87

4

Guylian

81

5

Thorntons

73

3

Ferrero Rocher

68

3

Cadbury

61

5

Lindt

57

5

Nestle

55

3

Mars

45

5

Divine Chocolate

36

5

Hotel Chocolat

35

5

N.B. no tasting was carried out in the course of this analysis.

The majority of the brands have a good or excellent Financial Scores (5 is best), supporting last year’s suggestion that the recession has done little to dampen consumers’ appetite for chocolate. In 2011 total sales for the sector were a mouth-watering £3.98 billion.  

The Environmental Score (where 1 is the worst and 100 is the best) is based on a company’s carbon emissions from electricity and gas (modelled or reported) divided by its annual turnover, and then compared with companies of a similar size and industry.

Environmental Scores are subject to change as companies update their data and as amee receives new data. As emissions are largely modelled, complete Environmental Score accuracy relies on individual companies making sure their unique amee profiles are up-to-date with actual data.

Click here for details on how the Scores are calculated

ChocO2ate Emissions

Turning cocoa beans into chocolate bars on the supermarket shelf comes at an environmental price.  

Planet for People, for example, estimate that the production of 100g of chocolate produces 300g of CO2.  

A few years ago there seemed to be some momentum towards labelling individual products like chocolate bars with a unique carbon footprint and in 2008 Cadbury’s gave its 49g bar of Dairy Milk a carbon footprint of 169g.     

The footprint incorporated the emissions at all stages of the supply chain, including agriculture, transport, packaging and waste streams.

However, the complexities of product labelling has slowed progress and Tesco, one of the scheme’s leading proponents, dropped its commitment to carbon-labels in January 2012 after other supermarkets “failed to follow its lead”.

That’s a shame as the concept of ethical consumerism relies on good quality information about the products we buy. 

So maybe the above list can help you choose the next time you want a sugar boost. 

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