London vs Manchester: the Companies behind the Construction

With recent signs that the UK construction industry is picking up, amee has had a look at the business performance of the companies behind some of the latest buildings in London and Manchester to see which ‘construction team’ is best.

Manchester

No. 2 St Peter’s Square

The plans for Manchester’s £80m new office and shopping complex in the city centre were unveiled earlier this year. With 11 stories of glass-fronted modern real estate, the building will provide over 160,000 sq ft of office space, 5,500 sq ft of shops, and 43 parking spaces.   

The Team

Role

Company Name

Current Environmental Score

Annual Emissions (tCO2e)

Architect

Ian Simpson Architects

94

198

Agent

DTZ

68

7,207

Planning Advisor

Deloitte

99

19,599

Cost Consultancy

Davis Langdon

65

3,771

Mechanical & Electrical Consultant

TB&A

27

123

Design Consultant

English Heritage

40

1,521

Finance

Property Finance International

58

27

 

 

Average: 64

 

[NB: The Environmental Score (where 1 is the worst and 100 is the best) is based on a company’s carbon emissions from electricity and gas (modelled or reported) divided by its annual turnover, and then compared with companies of a similar size and  industry.

These are subject to change as companies update their data and as amee receives new data. Scores are not comparable across industries or size groups. Click here for more details.]  

Manchester Business School

The £75m new research and teaching headquarters at the Manchester Metropolitan Business School is considered one of the most environmentally sustainable academic buildings in the UK. Features include three bore holes which provide the building with natural water for cooling and heating, and widespread use of local sustainable materials.   

The Team

Role

Company Name

Current Environmental Score

Annual Emissions (tCO2e)

Architect

Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios

38

1,109

Construction

Sir Robert McAlpine

65

23,795

Project Management

Paul Cleworth

6

34

Mechanical & Electrical Engineers

AECOM

33

82,700

Quantity Surveyor

Rider Levett Bucknall

99

344

CDM Coordinator

Appelyard & Trew

100

64

 

 

Average: 57

 

London

The Cheesegrater

Set to open towards the end of 2014, the Cheesegrater aka the Leadenhall Building is 225 metres high and features a seven story atrium open to the public. Located in the heart of the capital’s financial district tenants will include the UK’s largest insurance broker Aon.  

The Team

Role

Company Name

Current Environmental Score

Annual Emissions (tCO2e)

Architect

Rogers Stirk Harbours and Partners

4

1,908

Real Estate Investment

British Land

65

8,883

Real Estate Investment

OMERS Private Equity

43

61

Construction

Laing O’Rourke

49

84,714

Structural Engineers

Arup

96

134

 

 

Average: 57

 

The Shard

At 307 metres and 87 stories high, the Shard is Europe’s tallest building and is filled with a hotel, flats, shops, restaurants and offices. It is powered by a natural gas Combined Heat & Power (CHP) unit which can produce over 1.1 MW of both heat and electricity simultaneously.  

The Team

Role

Company Name

Current Environmental Score

Annual Emissions (tCO2e)

Developer

Sellar Property

77

30

Affiliate Architect

Adamson Associates

89

194

Project Management

Turner & Townsend

72

6,854

Services Engineers

Arup

96

134

Structural Engineers

WSP

69

8,313

Quantity Surveyor

Davis Langdon

65

3,771

Principal Contractor

Mace

71

26,205

Financial Advisor

Qatar National Bank

83

215

 

 

Average: 78

 

And the Winner is…

In terms of average Environmental Score, the construction team with the highest (and best) Score is The Shard with 78, while the other teams come in at 64, 57 and 57.

amee’s Environmental Scores are based on annual carbon emissions that, at least in these examples, are largely modelled, so Score accuracy relies on individual companies making sure their unique amee profiles are up-to-date with accurate data.

And not every company involved with the construction of these buildings has been included in the analysis, for example they aren’t registered with Companies House. 

In this sense the ‘rankings’ in this blog are only an indication of a team’s overall environmental performance.

Seeing Construction in a New Light

While comparing the ameeScores and emissions of these different construction teams is an interesting exercise, the main point of the post is to illustrate that we should also look behind a product (in this case a building) when considering overall sustainability. 

Even if the product itself conforms to a high environmental standard we need to keep making progress with all the players in the supply chain.

After all, only if all companies lower their environmental impact can we ensure a long-term and environmentally sustainable economic recovery.

Back to AMEE Blog